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dc.contributor.authorLittle, Laura
dc.date2021-11-25T13:35:14.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T11:56:09Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T11:56:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-26T08:44:34-07:00
dc.identifieryjlh/vol28/iss2/1
dc.identifier.contextkey10954414
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/7533
dc.description.abstractCan a speech restriction ever be inherently good? Can we ever justify censorship as intrinsically beneficial, and not simply a justifiable means of protecting something more important than free expression? For those steeped in American law and culture, these questions may seem almost heretical. But they deserve exploring, particularly given the prevalence and variety of censorship in the United States and elsewhere in the world. Happily, a context exists for exploring the questions that is less threatening and more entertaining than totalitarian thought control. The context is humor: jokes, cartoons, vignettes, and other expressions that make us laugh.
dc.titleLaughing at Censorship
dc.source.journaltitleYale Journal of Law & the Humanities
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T11:56:09Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/yjlh/vol28/iss2/1
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1450&context=yjlh&unstamped=1


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