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dc.contributor.authorAyres, Ian
dc.contributor.authorNalebuff, Barry
dc.date2021-11-25T13:34:17.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T11:36:00Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T11:36:00Z
dc.date.issued1997-01-01T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifierfss_papers/1498
dc.identifier.contextkey1744978
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/728
dc.description.abstractWhen we communicate one thing, we often unavoidably send other messages. To start with a simple example, imagine that Ian says to Barry, "My mother's name is Karen." From Ian's communication, Barry learns more than just the underlying bit of information (mom's name). The communication also lets Barry know that: (a) Ian knows his mom's name, and (b) Ian knows that Barry knows Ian's mom's name. What is less well understood is that when we teach, we learn. When Ian tells Barry about his mom, Ian learns several things.
dc.titleCommon Knowledge as a Barrier to Negotiation
dc.source.journaltitleFaculty Scholarship Series
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T11:36:00Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/fss_papers/1498
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2497&context=fss_papers&unstamped=1


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