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dc.contributor.authorGaber, Paula
dc.date2021-11-25T13:35:07.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T11:54:01Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T11:54:01Z
dc.date.issued2015-11-02T11:55:39-08:00
dc.identifieryjlf/vol10/iss2/2
dc.identifier.contextkey7792355
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/6838
dc.description.abstractDuring my second semester of law school, I was telling a second-year friend of mine about how unhappy I was with my law school experience. She nodded knowingly, and suggested that I read an essay that had been written by two Yale students in the 1980's. Shortly after our conversation, I found and read Catherine Weiss and Louise Melling's article entitled The Legal Education of Twenty Women, a study of twenty women at Yale Law School. From the first sentence of the essay, which asserts that men "made American law and American law schools by and for themselves," I felt a tremendous sense of what can only be described as relief It was exhilarating to read a description of my own experiences in the pages of a distinguished law review. The Weiss and Melling essay both validated my feelings and showed me that I was not alone in my feelings of isolation and bewilderment in the law school environment.
dc.title"JUST TRYING TO BE HUMAN IN THIS PLACE": THE LEGAL EDUCATION OF TWENTY WOMEN
dc.source.journaltitleYale Journal of Law & Feminism
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T11:54:01Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/yjlf/vol10/iss2/2
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1140&context=yjlf&unstamped=1


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