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dc.contributor.authorLight, Matthew
dc.date2021-11-25T13:35:03.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T11:52:51Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T11:52:51Z
dc.date.issued1999-01-01T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifieryjil/vol24/iss2/6
dc.identifier.contextkey9233469
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/6402
dc.description.abstractThis Note argues that national regimes of land-use regulation-the whole body of a country's institutions, laws, and jurisprudence that regulates building and development-can be understood only in the context of distinct political and legal regimes. National land-use regimes do not arise in response to universal laws of the market that exert the same influence at any location on the planet. Rather, land-use regimes differ from country to country. They are embedded in a complex, historically developing framework of ideology, law, and culture. If land-use controls regulate the physical shape of the communities we live in, then it is history itself that regulates what kind of community we view as wholesome, normal, and desirable-our ideas of what "the city" and "the good city" mean.
dc.titleDifferent Ideas of the City: Origins of Metropolitan Land-Use Regimes in the United States, Germany, and Switzerland
dc.source.journaltitleYale Journal of International Law
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T11:52:51Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/yjil/vol24/iss2/6
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1109&context=yjil&unstamped=1


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