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dc.contributor.authorTinsman, Heidi
dc.date2021-11-25T13:35:02.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T11:52:28Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T11:52:28Z
dc.date.issued1992-01-01T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifieryjil/vol17/iss1/11
dc.identifier.contextkey9453982
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/6261
dc.description.abstractSex still sells. It was standing room only at the Panel entitled "The International Sexual Exploitation of Women: Prostitution, Surrogacy, and Commercial Marriage." The preceding Panels, though thoughtful and provocative, did not generate the same degree of interest. Panel IV apparently struck a different chord than did previous discussions on subsistence farming and domestic service, maquiladora unions and GATT treaties: Sex-work seemed unique, if not titillating. But just what is so unique about sex-work? Why do surrogacy and bride-selling pose problems different from those raised by garment-making and grape-picking? Why does the prostitute epitomize the most exploited woman? "Female sexuality," of course, is what is different about sex-work. Feminists attack men's control over it; paternalists rush to protect it in the name of women.
dc.titleBehind the Sexual Division of Labor: Connecting Sex to Capitalist Production
dc.source.journaltitleYale Journal of International Law
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T11:52:28Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/yjil/vol17/iss1/11
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1594&context=yjil&unstamped=1


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