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dc.contributor.authorBrilmayer, Lea
dc.date2021-11-25T13:35:02.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T11:52:25Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T11:52:25Z
dc.date.issued1991-01-01T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifieryjil/vol16/iss1/5
dc.identifier.contextkey9431185
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/6247
dc.description.abstractEthnic violence pervades the news, from Eastern Europe and the Soviet Republics to Sri Lanka, Eritrea, and India. Although some ethnic struggles concern issues of domestic political fairness, many involve secessionist claims. Secessionist demands, unlike claims about domestic political fairness, cannot be satisfied through domestic political reforms. Instead, they aim to redraw the political boundaries. Because secessionist movements call for international recognition of the states they seek to create, they necessarily concern the world community. The right to secede is a matter of international law.
dc.titleSecession and Self-Determination: A Territorial Interpretation
dc.source.journaltitleYale Journal of International Law
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T11:52:26Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/yjil/vol16/iss1/5
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1572&context=yjil&unstamped=1


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