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dc.contributor.authorBowett, Derek
dc.date2021-11-25T13:35:02.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T11:52:15Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T11:52:15Z
dc.date.issued1987-01-01T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifieryjil/vol12/iss2/8
dc.identifier.contextkey9362532
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/6185
dc.description.abstractIn his introduction to the Special Feature in the Fall 1984 issue of the Yale Journal of International Law, Professor Reisman proclaimed the study of "incidents" as a "new genre in the study of international law."' Although Reisman's article is challenging, innovative, and eminently readable-as one would expect from his pen-one must nevertheless question whether the incident methodology is truly a new genre, as he claims, or whether this belief is simply a delusion which distracts us from the more serious problems of studying international law.
dc.titleInternational Incidents: New Genre or New Delusion?
dc.source.journaltitleYale Journal of International Law
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T11:52:15Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/yjil/vol12/iss2/8
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1508&context=yjil&unstamped=1


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