• AIDS AND HOMELESSNESS: PERSONAL ACCOUNTS

      1991-01-01
      The following accounts were originally presented at federal and local hearings on the subject of AIDS and homelessness. All of the authors are members of Anger into Direct Action (AIDA) a self-empowerment direct action group based in New York City, whose members are homeless people with HIV.
    • Black Nation Under Siege

      Alim Muhammad, Dr. Abdul (1991-01-01)
      In the name of Allah the Beneficent, the Merciful, the one, the true and the living God, the Lord of all of the world, the creator of all living things, the sustainer, the nourisher of that which he has created. In the name of his messengers and servants which include Moses, Jesus and Mohammed and in the name of every righteous man and woman who has ever lived or who is living today, in the name of our foreparents who were kidnapped and made slaves and whose unmourned and unburied corpses lined the floor of the Atlantic Ocean, I would like to offer to you, the students and faculty here at the Yale University Law School the Nation of Islam's greetings of peace in the Arabic language: "Asalaamu-Alaikum."
    • COMING OUT FOR GAY RIGHTS

      Henderson, Thelton (1992-01-01)
      Often at a gathering such as this one there is a natural tendency to focus on the issues facing our own communities. Speakers at a discussion on gay and lesbian issues might discuss topics such as AIDS, the rights of domestic partners, or ways to eliminate sexual orientation discrimination. Speakers at a discussion focusing on African-American issues might discuss affirmative action, black unemployment, or the problems of drugs in the black community. However, rarely does either community discuss issues of common concern such as the unique problems faced by Black gays and lesbians, or of the need to eliminate hate violence directed at both communities.
    • DEATH SQUADS IN THE UNITED STATES: CONFESSIONS OF A GOVERNMENT TERRORIST

      Churchill, Ward (1992-01-01)
      During the first half of the 1970s, the American Indian Movement (AIM) came to the forefront of a drive to realize the rights of treaty-guaranteed national sovereignty on behalf of North America's indigenous peoples. For the government and major corporate interests of the United States, this liberatory challenge represented a considerable threat. On the one hand, Indians possess clear legal and moral rights to the full exercise of self-determination; on the other hand, their reserved land base contains substantial quantities of critical mineral resources. More than half of all known "domestic" U.S. uranium reserves lie within the boundaries of present- day Indian reservations, as do as much as a quarter of the high grade low sulphur coal, a fifth of the oil and natural gas, and major deposits of copper and other metals.' Loss of internal colonial control over these items would confront U.S. 6lites with significant strategic and economic problems.
    • IN THE SPIRIT OF CRAZY HORSE: THE CASE OF LEONARD PELTIER

      Bushyhead, Yvonne (1991-01-01)
      Leonard Peltier, a Native American of Anishinabe/ Lakota descent, gets up at 6:30 a.m. with the other prisoners in Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary in Kansas. He eats when they eat and, like everyone else, has to be in his cell at 10:00 p.m. for the last countdown of the day. There is one distinct difference between Peltier and the other prisoners at Leavenworth - widespread solidarity outside the prison.
    • INTRODUCING LAW AND LIBERATION

      1989-01-01
      In the journal, we hope to present both the failures of law and the possibility of using that same law for progressive ends. This means not only bringing different issues into the legal discourse, but also challenging the nature of that discourse - we want to explore new ideas about what is worth writing about as well as different ways of framing the issues.
    • Is Law and Liberation an oxymoron?

      1989-01-01
      Is Law and Liberation an oxymoron?
    • LANGUAGE, IDENTITY AND LIBERATION: A CRITIQUE OF THE TERM AND CONCEPT "PEOPLE OF COLOR"

      Escobar, Elizam (1991-01-01)
      Any critical discussion on the question of identity must remind us that the process of liberation is not only a process of self-determination and power but also an internal process of self-examination. This internal process is valid and important in and of itself, but when it is present in the political/ideological struggle for liberation, it becomes crucial and qualitatively determinant.
    • LAW, LEGITIMACY AND BLACK REVOLUTION

      Bowen, James (1989-01-01)
      The rise in militancy among Black American youth was one of the most seminal and significant phenomena of the late 1960's, because of the decisive social and political changes it engendered in the lives of Black people and in several other sectors of United States society. This article examines the history and etiology of Black students in the campus and urban turmoil of that period. This examination should be seen in tandem with several recently published appraisals of the civil rights and youth-student protest movements of the 1960s-70s. Most of these evaluations have focused on the role of white students in the social unrest of that era.
    • LEGISLATION ESPECIALLY FOR THE NEGRO? THE BLACK PRESS RESPONDS TO EARLY SUPREME COURT CIVIL RIGHTS DECISIONS

      Wycoff, David (1992-01-01)
      The years 1873-1883 form perhaps the most important decade in United States constitutional history. In the course of deciding a steady stream of cases involving the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth amendments, the Supreme Court laid the basis for the next century of the constitutional law of civil rights and civil liberties. Unfortunately, it was a "dreadful decade." In decision after decision, the Court struck down federal laws designed to protect civil rights and civil liberties, and devitalized the new amendments.
    • LOOKING BEYOND THE NUMBERS: AFRICAN AMERICANS AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

      Henderson, Thelton (1992-01-01)
      No judge, and certainly no Black judge, can help but be distressed and depressed on sentencing day. I conduct sentencing on Monday afternoon. These are afternoons spent sitting in a courtroom filled with mostly young Black males, waiting to be sentenced. Unfortunately, Monday afternoons are the one time during the week when I take the bench in my courtroom and look out not upon the customary sea of white faces, but instead upon a room full of many faces not unlike my own.
    • MOVE: A Double Standard of Justice?

      Washington, Linn (1989-01-01)
      An insignificant protest against the caging of animals at the Philadelphia Zoo in 1972 by a band of boisterous, profanity-spewing radicals known as MOVE marked the inauspicious beginning of a series of violent clashes between this increasingly lawless sect and brutal Philadelphia police officers. The confrontations culminated in a shoot-out between MOVE members and police on May 13, 1985, in which a police helicopter dropped a bomb on a heavily fortified row house occupied by MOVE. The bomb sparked a firestorm which killed 11 MOVE members and gutted 61 homes, leaving 250 people homeless. Although only three MOVE members were named in police arrest warrants, the dead included five children whose ages ranged from 7 to 14 years old. The series of conflicts between police and MOVE ultimately claimed a dozen lives and consumed close to $50 million in city expenditures.
    • MY DANCE WITH JUSTICE

      Njeri, Akua (1991-01-01)
      The legal system is viewed by many as the lynching system. We see Afrikan men and women arrested disproportionately to their total numbers in the population. We are railroaded through the courts or incarcerated as we await court dates because we can't pay exorbitant ransom (bond). We see thousands of Afrikan political prisoners and prisoners of war. So - is this liberty and justice for all? Not for the Afrikan, in a system that is perpetuated by the victimization of the victim. A victimization that is the life blood of this parasite, capitalism.
    • NOTES UNDER CURFEW: WEST COAST RIOTS INDICT BOTH RIGHT AND LEFT

      Jones, Anthony (1992-01-01)
      In this country, two big illusions get people through the night: the Mighty State and the American Left. Some folks enjoy the idea of a Big Brother keeping them safe from the masses; others sleep soundly imagining a Left Opposition keeping them safe from Big Brother. But the "Rodney King"uprisings in L.A. (and here in the Bay Area) have exposed us all, leaving both sets of people cringing in the firelight, our precious myths melted by the heat of L.A. burning.
    • OF LOVE AND LIBERATION: A REVIEW OF BREAKING BREAD

      Davis, Adrienne (1992-01-01)
      The label "Black intellectual" may be either oxymoronic or redundant, depending on the content one ascribes to the term and the historic context in which it is situated.
    • POLITICAL PRISONERS IN THE UNITED STATES: THE PUERTO RICAN CHARADE

      Rosado, Julio (1991-01-01)
      Julio Rosado is a former Political Prisoner of the United States and is currently on the International Commission of Freedom Now. This article is a sparsely edited version of a speech given at Yale University on April 30, 1990 as part of a forum on Political Prisoners in the United States sponsored by the Journal of Law and Liberation.
    • POPULAR TRIBUNALS, LEGAL STORYTELLING, AND THE PURSUIT OF A JUST LAW

      Waysdorf, Susan (1991-01-01)
      The current and historical realities of the U.S. legal system are best characterized by the contradiction between justice and order. Is this an irreparable rift? Have alternative forums for the pursuit of justice, contrary to the entrenched and formal legal system, emerged from community, political, or academic initiatives? What have been the social costs of the legal system's failure to deliver its intended good - justice? What examples exist of alternative justice systems from other countries and other times, from which we can create a visionary mosaic of possibilities towards a more just and ethical legal system? Is there a role for the excluded voices of the oppressed and for legal storytelling?
    • PREVENTIVE DETENTION: PREVENTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS?

      Whitehorn, Laura; Berkman, Alan (1991-01-01)
      Laura Whitehorn and Alan Berkman are two of the six political prisoners who are co-defendants in the Resistance Conspiracy Case (U.S. v. Whitehorn et al., 710 F.Supp. 803, D.D.C. 1989). The others are Susan Rosenberg, Marilyn Buck, Linda Evans, and Timothy Blunk. The six were indicted in May, 1988, for conspiracy to "influence change, and protest policies and practices of the U.S. government concerning various international and domestic matters through the use of violent and illegal means," and with carrying out a series of bombings against U.S. government and military targets, including the Capitol building following the invasion of Grenada and the shelling of Lebanon in 1983. According to Whitehom and Berkman, these actions constituted one part of the broader movements resisting racism, colonialism, and intervention in Central America, the Middle East, Africa, and Puerto Rico. The message of the bombings was that the U.S. government's denial of the right of oppressed nations to self-determination must be exposed and fought.