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dc.contributor.authorLangbein, John
dc.date2021-11-25T13:34:51.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T11:48:09Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T11:48:09Z
dc.date.issued1992-01-01T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifierfss_papers/548
dc.identifier.contextkey1627903
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/4926
dc.description.abstractWe are accustomed to viewing the Bill of Rights as a success story. With it, the American constitution-makers opened a new epoch in the centuries-old struggle to place effective limits on the abuse of state power. Not all of the Bill of Rights is a success story, however. While we are celebrating the Bill ofRights, we would do well to take note of that chapter of the Bill of Rights that has been a spectacular failure: the Framers' effort to embed jury trial as the exclusive mode of proceeding in cases of serious crime.
dc.titleOn the Myth of Written Constitutions: The Disappearance of Criminal Jury Trial
dc.source.journaltitleFaculty Scholarship Series
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T11:48:09Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/fss_papers/548
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1541&context=fss_papers&unstamped=1


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