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dc.contributor.authorHansmann, Henry
dc.date2021-11-25T13:34:49.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T11:47:14Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T11:47:14Z
dc.date.issued1972-01-01T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifierfss_papers/5049
dc.identifier.contextkey10609842
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/4589
dc.description.abstractThe federal criminal law is currently a chaotic collection of statutes enacted piecemeal over the past two centuries. Although there have been several attempts at codification, the result in each case has been little more than a rearrangement of the existing provisions. In recognition of the continuing need for revision, Congress in 1966 created the National Commission on Reform of Federal Criminal Laws, with a broad mandate to revise and recodify the current statutes. The Commission took its task seriously; in January 1971 it submitted tile final draft of a proposed Federal Criminal Code which, if enacted, would constitute a major reform.
dc.titlePiggyback Jurisdiction in the Proposed Federal Criminal Code
dc.source.journaltitleFaculty Scholarship Series
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T11:47:14Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/fss_papers/5049
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=6044&context=fss_papers&unstamped=1


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