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dc.contributor.authorLorenzen, Ernest
dc.date2021-11-25T13:34:44.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T11:45:50Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T11:45:50Z
dc.date.issued1928-01-01T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifierfss_papers/4570
dc.identifier.contextkey4657177
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/4076
dc.description.abstractCONTRACTS 1. Capacity. Capacity to contract is regarded by Anglo-American law as one of the operative facts of a legal transaction, and as subject to the law governing the validity of the particular transaction in general. On the continent it is felt that, insofar as any disability to contract is intended for the protection of the party in question, it should follow such party· into other states. For this reason the capacity of persons to contract was controlled in France, until the adoption of the Code Napoleon, by the law of domicil. Since then the law of nationality has been in force. Article 3, paragraph 3 of the French Civil Code provides: "Laws 1·elating to status and capacity of persons apply to French people, even residing in a foreign country."
dc.titleFrench Rules of the Conflict of Laws (Part 3)
dc.source.journaltitleFaculty Scholarship Series
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T11:45:50Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/fss_papers/4570
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5583&context=fss_papers&unstamped=1


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