• Book Review: Privacy and Confidentiality Issues: A Guide for Libraries and Their Lawyers

      Krishnaswami, Julie (2009-01-01)
      The privacy and confidentiality of library patrons concerned many public libraries after September 11, particularly because of the passage and enforcement of the Patriot Act. Theresa Chmara, a litigator who has represented the American Library Association, the Freedom to Read Foundation, and the American Bookseller’s Association, provides concise and useful guidelines for libraries about these and other related issues in Privacy and Confidentiality Issues: A Guide for Libraries and Their Lawyers. This work is highly recommend for public library directors but should be required professional reading for all library directors. Additionally, library schools, which have an obligation to educate future librarians about the First Amendment concept of privacy in the context of the library, should purchase this book. It also serves as a great edition to a law school’s First Amendment collection for the same reasons as well as to bolster an academic collection that may lack practice oriented sources in this area.
    • Book Review: The Legal Landscape -- A Review of John Copeland Nagle, Law's Environment: How the Law Shapes the Places We Live

      Krishnaswami, Julie (2011-01-01)
      In "Law's Environment: How the Law Shapes the Places We Live," Hone Copeland Nagle reflects on unremarkarkable geographical lands impacted by major environmental legislation and considers the values implicit in environmental legislation. Nagle's thesis is that multiple environmental laws typically weave together to shape a region. IN this text, the consequences of environmental legislation are examined by looking at the impact of the laws on the natural environment of five distinct places.
    • Book Review: Viral Spiral: How the Commoners Built a Digital Republic of Their Own

      Krishnaswami, Julie (2009-01-01)
      Book review of David Bollier's Viral Spiral (2008). The Internet today is controlled chaos: user-generated content on Web 2.0 platforms, blogs by citizen-journalists, social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, the photo-sharing community of Flickr, digital remixes of music and videos, wikis, open-access journals, and e-books. The Web has been transformed and a new cultural movement - known as "Free Culture" or "the commons" - is underway. Members of the Free Culture movement (commoners) value collaboration, share intellectual property, are self-directed, and resourceful. Yet these trailblazing individuals are simultaneously entrepreneurial and well-aware of traditional market forces. In Viral Spiral: A History of Our Movement, David Bollier argues that these values and behaviors are "history-making," creating a "new species of citizenship in modern life" and over time "this citizenship and the culture that it is fostering are likely to be a politically transforming force." This text is highly recommended for any law library’s collection.
    • It’s the Institution: Librarians Join the Revolution to Open the Judicial System to Self-Represented Litigants

      Krishnaswami, Julie (2009-01-01)
      Innovations in information literacy is not only taking place in academic law libraries, law firm libraries, and court libraries but simultaneously occurring in the legal system. Innovation also means rethinking - and remaking - institutions that no longer serve us well. As any lawyer or non-lawyer can confirm, the traditional legal system has ignored the needs of self-represented litigants, now flooding courtrooms, seeking solutions to real and significant problems. Yet, revolution is afoot, and the judicial system is responding to accommodate this new class of users. Presenter Richard Zorza, introduced by Charles Dyer as an "instigator of innovation," spoke about the movement to make courtrooms, judicial procedures, and the legal system as a whole, more friendly, open, and available to self-represented litigants at the Annual Meeting Program, "Law Libraries and Access to Justice Revolution."
    • Justice Sandra Day O'Conner: A Selected Annotated Bibliography

      Krishnaswami, Julie (2008-01-01)
      As the first woman appointed to the Supreme Court, Justice Sandra Day O’Connor is a profound and fascinating figure in American jurisprudence. During Ronald Reagan’s presidential campaign, he promised to appoint a woman to the Supreme Court, and he appointed Sandra Day O’Connor. She was confirmed in 1981 and spent the next twenty-four years on the Supreme Court bench, retiring in 2005. Before her time on the Court, Justice O’Connor devoted herself to public service as an assistant attorney general, deputy county attorney, Arizona state senator and senate minority leader, Maricopa County Superior Court judge, and Arizona Court of Appeals judge. Justice O’Connor’s roots are authentically western, having been raised on a working cattle ranch near the Gila River, bordering Arizona and New Mexico. She is comfortable outdoors in the harsh desert, riding horses, and assisting with ranch work. Yet she is similarly comfortable as an intellectual. She graduated from Stanford University and Stanford University School of Law. Likewise, Justice O’Connor has also been committed to her family as a devoted daughter, wife, and mother of three. When she was appointed to the Supreme Court to replace retiring Justice Potter Stewart, questions loomed about how she would rule on important constitutional issues, including affirmative action and racial and gender equality. For instance, during her tenure as a state legislator and state court judge, she did not face any “true affirmative action” case, and produced no writing on the issue. When responding to questions about affirmative action at her confirmation hearings, Justice O’Connor only observed that it was an issue likely to reach the Court in the future. She was correct, and it is her affirmative action and discrimination decisions that became some of her most notable opinions. As the annotations below demonstrate, commentators and legal scholars have reflected on Justice O’Connor’s work as a woman, a conservative, and a former politician. Her term ended in 2005, and scholars are beginning the process of reflecting on her years on the Court as well as her influence on constitutional law. In an effort to begin and contribute to this analysis, this selected annotated bibliography focuses on both the substantive and scholarly materials Justice O’Connor wrote, and the legal scholarship written about her and her jurisprudence. It is intended as a tool for researchers, and the categorization is intended to assist them by providing logical access to this material.
    • The Future of Law Librarianship

      Krishnaswami, Julie; Bailey, Scott (2013-01-01)
    • The Future of Law Librarianship

      Krishnaswami, Julie; Bailey, Scott (2013-01-01)