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dc.contributor.authorBorchard, Edwin
dc.date2021-11-25T13:34:34.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T11:42:09Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T11:42:09Z
dc.date.issued1929-01-01T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifierfss_papers/3440
dc.identifier.contextkey2394437
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/2849
dc.description.abstractYou may think it a little presumptuous, and I guess it is, to have a man come here from the East and undertake to point out any defects in the law of Ohio. My interest in the subject of declaratory judgments is such, however, that I have ventured to incur whatever dangers there may be in that undertaking. I was the more disposed to run those risks because what I hope to discuss today is not anything really new, but is an institution that England has had for over fifty years and which has been adopted in some twenty-three states in the United States. The declaratory judgment procedure has been adopted by nearly every neighbor that Ohio has, including Pennsylvania, Indiana, Kentucky, and Michigan; so that, unless Ohio does come into line, it may soon be called a "backward state". For that reason I ventured to come west to see if I could not, in conference with lawyers at the bar, persuade you of the merits of this procedure, for I think you will agree, before I have gone very far, that there are numerous situations in life requiring judicial settlement that are not covered by the existing procedure.
dc.subjectEngland
dc.subjectScotland
dc.titleDeclaratory Judgments
dc.source.journaltitleFaculty Scholarship Series
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T11:42:09Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/fss_papers/3440
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4440&context=fss_papers&unstamped=1


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