Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJames, Fleming
dc.date2021-11-25T13:34:31.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T11:41:20Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T11:41:20Z
dc.date.issued1954-01-01T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifierfss_papers/3188
dc.identifier.contextkey2297433
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/2576
dc.description.abstractUnder the fault principle as we know it today there are many situation in which A is held liable to C for damages which B's negligence has caused C, even though A has been free from negligence or other fault. In such a case A is made vicariously liable for B's fault, such liability being imposed because of some relationship between A and B. In this article we shall examine the bases (in history, in legal reasoning, and in policy) and also the extent of such vicarious liability. Before that is done, however, certain preliminary points should be clarified or emphasized.
dc.subjectVicarious Liability
dc.subject28 Tul. L. Rev. 161 (1954)
dc.titleVicarious Liability
dc.source.journaltitleFaculty Scholarship Series
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T11:41:21Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/fss_papers/3188
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4178&context=fss_papers&unstamped=1


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Vicarious_Liability.pdf
Size:
4.938Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record