Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKrishnaswami, Julie
dc.date2021-11-25T13:36:36.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T12:32:19Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T12:32:19Z
dc.date.issued2009-01-01T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifierylss/14
dc.identifier.contextkey3170968
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/17686
dc.description.abstractBook review of David Bollier's Viral Spiral (2008). The Internet today is controlled chaos: user-generated content on Web 2.0 platforms, blogs by citizen-journalists, social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, the photo-sharing community of Flickr, digital remixes of music and videos, wikis, open-access journals, and e-books. The Web has been transformed and a new cultural movement - known as "Free Culture" or "the commons" - is underway. Members of the Free Culture movement (commoners) value collaboration, share intellectual property, are self-directed, and resourceful. Yet these trailblazing individuals are simultaneously entrepreneurial and well-aware of traditional market forces. In Viral Spiral: A History of Our Movement, David Bollier argues that these values and behaviors are "history-making," creating a "new species of citizenship in modern life" and over time "this citizenship and the culture that it is fostering are likely to be a politically transforming force." This text is highly recommended for any law library’s collection.
dc.titleBook Review: Viral Spiral: How the Commoners Built a Digital Republic of Their Own
dc.source.journaltitleLibrarian Scholarship Series
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T12:32:19Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/ylss/14
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1010&context=ylss&unstamped=1


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Book_Review__Viral_Spiral___Ho ...
Size:
63.15Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record