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dc.contributor.authorHeckman, James
dc.contributor.authorVerkerke, J.
dc.date2021-11-25T13:36:33.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T12:31:03Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T12:31:03Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-15T08:48:19-07:00
dc.identifierylpr/vol8/iss2/6
dc.identifier.contextkey7723719
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/17429
dc.description.abstractThe basic facts of black economic progress are well known.' Since 1940, black wages and occupational status have improved, approaching the higher levels that Whites enjoy.2 Beginning in 1965, the rate of improvement in black relative wages and occupational status accelerated. However, since 1975, relative black economic status has not advanced and may have deteriorated slightly. The South is the region of the United States where Blacks have made the most dramatic gains in relative wages and occupational status.
dc.titleRacial Disparity and Employment Discrimination Law: An Economic Perspective
dc.source.journaltitleYale Law & Policy Review
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T12:31:03Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/ylpr/vol8/iss2/6
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1186&context=ylpr&unstamped=1


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