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dc.contributor.authorDurham, Mary
dc.contributor.authorLa Fond, John
dc.date2021-11-25T13:36:31.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T12:29:58Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T12:29:58Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-06T12:10:59-07:00
dc.identifierylpr/vol3/iss2/6
dc.identifier.contextkey7685649
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/17169
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, the power of the state has included the power to commit mentally ill citizens to psychiatric hospitals against their will. The state's authority to confine the mentally ill rests upon two distinct legal doctrines: parens patriae and police power. Under its parens patriae authority, the state acts on behalf of certain individuals who are believed incapable of acting in their own best interest. The police power authorizes the state to confine certain persons for prevention of harm to the community.
dc.titleThe Empirical Consequences and Policy Implications of Broadening the Statutory Criteria for Civil Commitmentt
dc.source.journaltitleYale Law & Policy Review
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T12:29:58Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/ylpr/vol3/iss2/6
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1059&context=ylpr&unstamped=1


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