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dc.contributor.authorFord, Matthew
dc.date2021-11-25T13:36:30.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T12:29:40Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T12:29:40Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-02T07:54:12-08:00
dc.identifierylpr/vol27/iss1/2
dc.identifier.contextkey7892310
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/17090
dc.description.abstractThe day after the Supreme Court's decision in Gratz v. Bollinger, newspapers hailed it as a defining moment in the history of affirmative action. The New York Times reported that, along with its companion case, Grutter v. Bollinger, Gratz "provided a blueprint for taking race into account without running afoul of the Constitution's guarantee of equal protection." The Chicago Tribune called the pair of cases the "most significant and wide-ranging affirmative action rulings in a generation. And the Los Angeles Times questioned whether formulaic admissions systems could continue at all in light of the Court's invalidation of a race-based point system.
dc.titleAdequacy and the Public Rights Model of the Class Action After Gratz v. Bollinger
dc.source.journaltitleYale Law & Policy Review
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T12:29:40Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/ylpr/vol27/iss1/2
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1564&context=ylpr&unstamped=1


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