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dc.contributor.authorBaily, Mary
dc.date2021-11-25T13:36:27.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T12:28:44Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T12:28:44Z
dc.date.issued2015-11-04T06:11:38-08:00
dc.identifierylpr/vol16/iss2/5
dc.identifier.contextkey7801040
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/16848
dc.description.abstractFrom the advance publicity for Mortal Peril: Our Inalienable Right to Healthcare?, one might suppose the book would offer a closely reasoned argument for a market-based health care system with minimum government involvement and maximum deference to individual autonomy. While Epstein does advocate such a system, he fails to provide the reasoned argument. The book actually presents a collection of topics that seem to have been chosen because Epstein has strong views about them, not because taken together they yield a coherent view of health policy. To make matters worse, the discussion of each topic is a confusing mixture of broad generalizations, often unsupported by argument or data, and narrow analyses of specific laws, court cases, and regulations.
dc.titleOur Irrelevant Right to Health Care
dc.source.journaltitleYale Law & Policy Review
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T12:28:44Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/ylpr/vol16/iss2/5
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1339&context=ylpr&unstamped=1


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