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dc.contributor.authorReinhardt, Uwe
dc.date2021-11-25T13:36:26.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T12:28:21Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T12:28:21Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-20T07:29:03-07:00
dc.identifierylpr/vol10/iss2/8
dc.identifier.contextkey7737178
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/16745
dc.description.abstractThe word efficiency has taken on a powerful role in the current debate on health policy and, indeed, in public policy in general. It is widely taken for granted that an efficient approach is ispo facto superior to an inefficient one. The fastest way to eliminate a rival policy from the field is simply to brand it inefficient. Usually, the involvement of government in the implementation of a policy is taken as prima facie evidence of inherent inefficiency.
dc.titleReflections on the Meaning of Efficiency: Can Efficiency Be Separated from Equity?
dc.source.journaltitleYale Law & Policy Review
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T12:28:21Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/ylpr/vol10/iss2/8
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1230&context=ylpr&unstamped=1


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