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dc.contributor.authorGarland, Michael
dc.date2021-11-25T13:36:26.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T12:28:18Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T12:28:18Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-20T07:29:10-07:00
dc.identifierylpr/vol10/iss2/12
dc.identifier.contextkey7737556
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/16734
dc.description.abstractThe American community soon will complete its slow march toward universal health insurance, which began before World War I with debates about "compulsory insurance" for workers. Back in 1935, when the United States annually spent under $30 per person on health care, the overall U.S. health-care budget accounted for only 4.1 % of the Gross National Product (GNP). As of 1940, hospital insurance still covered less than 10% of the U.S. population. Today, the health-care backdrop looks markedly different. Approximately 85% of our nation's citizens now have some form of third-party assistance (public or private) to help pay for medical goods and services. National per capita spending on health care approaches $3100 per year; the 1992 health-care budget likely will exceed $800 billion, approximating 13% of the GNP.
dc.titleLight on the Black Box of Basic Health Care: Oregon's Contribution to the National Movement Toward Universal Health Insurance
dc.source.journaltitleYale Law & Policy Review
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T12:28:19Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/ylpr/vol10/iss2/12
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1234&context=ylpr&unstamped=1


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