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dc.contributor.authorMcKinley, Maggie
dc.date2021-11-25T13:35:39.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T12:06:32Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T12:06:32Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-01T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifierylj/vol127/iss6/2
dc.identifier.contextkey14373852
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13051/10331
dc.description.abstractThe administrative state is suffering from a crisis of legitimacy. Many have questioned the legality of the myriad commissions, boards, and agencies through which much of our modern governance occurs. Scholars such as Jerry Mashaw, Theda Skocpol, and Michele Dauber, among others, have provided compelling institutional histories, illustrating that administrative lawmaking has roots in the early American republic. Others have attempted to assuage concerns through interpretive theory, arguing that the Administrative Procedure Act of 1946 implicitly amended our Constitution. Solutions offered thus far, however, have yet to provide a deeper understanding of the meaning and function of the administrative state within our constitutional framework. Nor have the lawmaking models of classic legal process theory, on which much of our public law rests, captured the nuanced democratic function of these commissions, boards, and agencies.
dc.titlePetitioning and the Making of the Administrative State
dc.source.journaltitleYale Law Journal
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-26T12:06:33Z
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/ylj/vol127/iss6/2
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=9287&context=ylj&unstamped=1


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